County Extension Big Cuts

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ski
Guard bee
Posts: 1018
Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 10:40 am
Location: Whitsett, NC

County Extension Big Cuts

Post by ski » Fri Mar 25, 2011 7:19 pm

Got this E-mail from Karen Neill of the Guilford County extension office.
I hope it does not turn into a problem for the Guilford county beekeepers.

Hello Extension Supporters.


I have a time-sensitive issue that I could use your assistance with. NC Cooperative Extension is looking at big budget cuts. The budget cuts being bandied about are in the range of 25-30% for Extension (which translates into huge job cuts), I'm attaching a letter written by Dr. Joe Zublena, CES Director, that can be used in communicating with elected officials in Raleigh. The state legislature will be discussing the education budget next week, so every little bit of input they receive will only help our cause. If Extension is important to you, now is the time to speak up. Because time is so short, either phone calls or emails will likely reach the legislators in time to have impact; snail mail may not do much good. The elected officials for Guilford County are copied below:


NC SENATE
26th Senatorial District (Multi County)
Philip E. (Phil) Berger
State Legislative Office Bldg.
Raleigh, NC 27602-2808
(919) 733-4111
311 Pinewood Place
Eden, NC 27288

27th Senatorial District
Don Vaughan
State Legislative Office Bldg.
Raleigh, NC 27601-2808
(919) 733-5856


The Legislative switchboard

telephone number is 919-733-4111.

Clerk: 919- 733-7761
28th Senatorial District
Katie G. Dorsett
State Legislative Office Bldg.
Raleigh, NC 27601-2808

1000 English St
Greensboro, NC 27401
(336) 275-0628


33rd Senatorial District (Multi County)
Stan Bingham
State Legislative Office Bldg.
Raleigh, NC 27601-2808
3726 Stokes Road
Denton, NC 27235
336-857-2763


NC House of Representatives 57th House District
Pricey Harrison
Phone: 919-733-5771
Email: Priceyh@ncleg.net
Legislative Mailing Address:
NC House of Representatives
16 W. Jones Street, Room 2119
Raleigh, NC 27601-1096




58th House District
Alma Adams
Phone: 919-733-5902
Email: Almaa@ncleg.net
Legislative Mailing Address:
NC House of Representatives
300 N. Salisbury Street, Room 304
Raleigh, NC 27603-5925




The Legislative switchboard
telephone number is 919-733-4111.
59th House District
Maggie Jeffus
Phone: 919-733-5191
Email: Maggiej@ncleg.net
Legislative Mailing Address:
NC House of Representatives
16 W. Jones Street, Room 2204
Raleigh, NC 27601-1096



60th House District
Earl Jones
Phone:
919-733-5825
Email: Earlj@ncleg.net
Legislative Mailing Address:
NC House of Representatives
300 N. Salisbury Street, Room 536
Raleigh, NC 27603-5925




Clerk: 919- 733-7760 61st House District
Laura I. Wiley
Phone: 919-733-5877
Email: Lauraw@ncleg.net

Legislative Mailing Address:
NC House of Representatives
300 N. Salisbury Street, Room 513
Raleigh, NC 27603-5925




62nd House District
John M. Blust
Phone: 919-733-5781
Email: Johnbl@ncleg.net
Legislative Mailing Address:
NC House of Representatives
16 W. Jones Street, Room 1109
Raleigh, NC 27601-1096







• The CES budget is only 0.23% of the General Fund. The Research Budget is 0.30% of the General Fund. Combining these two with NCDA CS (0.31%) and NCA&T SU, the primary research, extension, marketing and development organizations supporting agriculture are only 1% of the General Fund. Agriculture is the #1 industry at $74.3B and more than 688,000 jobs in the state. This data clearly shows a very frugal, effective and efficient system of support for such a significant and important industry in our state.
• A recent (March 2011) Council on Agriculture Science and Technology report showed North Carolina is among the states that has seen the greatest growth from 1960 through 2004 in agricultural output. In addition the report showed nationally that agricultural productivity is largely responsible for the fact that the percentage of U.S. household income spent on food has decreased from 22.3 to 9.5 percent at the same time that total food consumption increased. The report also points to studies that conclude that each dollar spent on public agricultural research returns $32 to society.


Anything you can do as individuals will be appreciated during this budget crunch time. Thank you for your ongoing support of Extension and its activities.


Thanks!
Karen



TO: State Advisory Council Members
County Advisory Leadership Councils
County Commodity Committees
Extension Foundation Leadership
FROM: Joe Zublena
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Extension, Engagement, and Economic Development and
Associate Dean and Director for North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
DATE March 25, 2011
SUBJECT: Supports of Cooperative Extension and the Agricultural Research Station
Dean Wynne informed us that the Higher Education Budget will be discussed next week. As you recall, this is where the College's Agricultural Programs which include the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) and Agricultural Research Service (ARS) budgets, reside. Per your previous requests, this note is to alert you that this weekend and next week is the time for greater action. There is no question that our budgets are in significant jeopardy.
Recent information from downtown has not been favorable for the University or us. Conversations for cuts are now in the range of 25 - 30%. For CES a 30% reduction is over $13M which would require the closing of 300 - 400 positions. Similar cuts face research. Needless to say this would be devastating to our abilities to meet the current and future needs of our citizens. In 2010 CES reported over 5.8 million contacts.
In addition to general budget reduction issues, this week the Legislative Program Evaluation Division (PED) released a draft of their 2011 – 2012 Work Plan, Potential Projects. This list contains 42 programs being put on the table for the legislature to determine which should be studied. Alphabetical listing put agriculture as #1 and was cited as follows:
“1. Agricultural Research and Extension Services
This proposed evaluation will explore potential strategies to optimize agricultural services provided by the land-grant universities and the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Together, 100 county Cooperative Extension Services, 18 agricultural research stations, the NC A&T University Farm, and 8 university field laboratories provide research and/or extension services. Other states, such as Nebraska, Virginia, and Wyoming have regionalized or otherwise restructured services to save costs. The total budget for entities that provide services to North Carolina farmers is approximately $52.1 million”.
Please note that Extension has now not only been linked to the Experiment Station review but of funds noted, approximately $37M is from CES. In addition, the university and NCDA CS have had a synergistic relationship regarding the experiment stations for years and this topic has already been studied. Also note the regional extension concept is not as effective as local presence within counties and most states that have this system have significantly less local support and fewer significant impacts. NC currently has one of the nation’s highest support levels from local governments because we align and work hand and hand with them. This study will not be beneficial to agriculture or CES.
Here are the links to the joint legislative Planning and Evaluation non-standing committee members and the entire PED list of possible studies.
http://www.ncleg.net/gascripts/Committe ... nding_6354
http://www.ncleg.net/DocumentSites/comm ... 203-18.pdf
Below are some additional key points that may be useful. Keep in mind every program we provide is at risk. When interacting with your legislators speak from the heart and about the programs you believe in and support within their and your districts.
• The CES budget is only 0.23% of the General Fund. The Research Budget is 0.30% of the General Fund. Combining these two with NCDA CS (0.31%) and NCA&T SU, the primary research, extension, marketing and development organizations supporting agriculture are only 1% of the General Fund. Agriculture is the #1 industry at $74.3B and more than 688,000 jobs in the state. This data clearly shows a very frugal, effective and efficient system of support for such a significant and important industry in our state.
• A recent (March 2011) Council on Agriculture Science and Technology report showed North Carolina is among the states that has seen the greatest growth from 1960 through 2004 in agricultural output. In addition the report showed nationally that agricultural productivity is largely responsible for the fact that the percentage of U.S. household income spent on food has decreased from 22.3 to 9.5 percent at the same time that total food consumption increased. The report also points to studies that conclude that each dollar spent on public agricultural research returns $32 to society. Information from this report validates that agricultural research and extension is a significant value to society and our efforts in NC have been one of the best in the county. This was not by accident, we’ve had a state that understood the importance of agriculture and invested in its future through CES and ARS.
• Research today provides adaptability, economic development, competitiveness and sustainability for our state’s future. Most research takes 4-10 years to provide reliable outcomes. Adoption of that research by producers and adaptation of the research for local conditions occur though Extension.
• 4-H is one of the Nation’s premier youth development programs. Compared to their peers, youth engaged in 4-H: stay in school longer, have higher graduation rates, have higher college attendance and graduation, smoke less, have significantly lower rates of criminal conduct and arrests, and are more involved in their communities. In 2010 NC 219,000 youth and 22,000 volunteers participated in 4-H. Youth in 4-H make significant contributions throughout the state and will be our future leaders just as many of our 1,000,000 4-H alums are leaders in their communities today.
• Since the early 1900’s NC communities have had strong leadership though the efforts of rural women participating in home demonstration clubs and now Extension and Community Associations. We will be celebrating their 100th anniversary this year and their accomplishment are many including the development of rural libraries and book mobile programs, establishing hot lunch programs in NC rural schools, selling more than $2M in war bonds for the WWII hospital ship, Larkspur whose total cost was $4M and helping bring electricity to rural NC. Today’s Family and Consumer Sciences Extension programs train women in leadership development and empower them to publicly address family and community issues, provide education for their families on financial management, energy conservation and nutritious and safe food preparation.
We appreciate your continued support for Extension and Research within your College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Your efforts today will shape the future!
Just some thoughts.

michelle
Nursebee
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Feb 17, 2011 10:31 am
Location: Kernersville, NC

Re: County Extension Big Cuts

Post by michelle » Sun Mar 27, 2011 3:23 pm

I am contacting them today. I have also cut and paste the talking points and contact information to some friends who may be interested. Thanks for passing this along. I would have never known.

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